Tag Archives: Health and Medicine

Making a Difference One Meal at a Time
Victoria MarkovitzMarch 20, 2015

Americans are used to hearing that they should eat more veggies to improve their health. But last month, a U.S. nutritional advisory panel took this a step further. By eating less meat, they stated in a report, Americans could protect the environment and promote future food security. The Scientific Report

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Combating the Winter Blues
Christiana ShermanMarch 3, 2015

Though the start of spring is only a few weeks away and daylight savings begins this Sunday, much of the United States remains entrapped in a wintry state of grey skies and early nights. For some, the winter season brings more than an endless cold. Many Americans suffer from Seasonal

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With the start of the New Year, many people adopted resolutions such as eating healthier, working out regularly, and managing stress. At the heart of these positive changes is a desire to be happier and healthier – there’s a reason people often wish others “a happy and healthy New Year.”

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Wanted: Bike-Friendly Infrastructure
Victoria MarkovitzDecember 24, 2014

When people hear that biking is the main way I get around the city, I usually get a similar response: “That’s great! I’d do it if it weren’t so dangerous.” People who bike can shed pounds, save money, and reduce their carbon footprint. However, cycling in the United States is riskier

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Checklists: A Necessary Tool for Reducing Error
Christiana ShermanDecember 19, 2014

In our work lives, we spend a large portion of our time not just carrying out daily tasks, but also keeping track of them and responding to the consequences of a mistake. Checklists are a common tool that many of us use to plan ahead or to schedule our day,

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Building Global Health Resilience
Lindsay PackNovember 18, 2014

The Ebola epidemic has thrust into the spotlight the world’s ability (or perhaps inability) to come together to rapidly address global health crises. Although some argue that there have been successes, the general consensus is that the international response was “too little, too late,” which resulted in greater spread of

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International development, broadly, means improving the quality of life for everyone.  Development practice, however, is a diverse and unwieldy field. There is no clear idea of what effective development strategies look like, nor are there implemented standards to hold development workers―state governments, inter-governmental organizations, non-profits, high school service learning programs,

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Discussion and anxiety about Ebola is rampant, particularly with the more recent diagnosis of Nina Pham and Amber Vinson, nurses at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital who treated the now-deceased Thomas Duncan, the only U.S. Ebola fatality. The current Ebola epidemic in West Africa is the largest in history; alongside the thousands

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Last week, an ethics panel at the World Health Organization decided the potential benefits of using experimental Ebola treatments outweigh the risks in the current outbreak. However, the decision has generated opposition from the medical community, bioethicists, and others who believe the potential consequences of using untested medications could do

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Two years ago, Nexight developed a white paper for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) NanoEngineering for Medicine and Biology Steering Committee highlighting the greatest  nanoengineering challenges biomedical scientists and engineers must solve together to overcome some of the most complex issues facing human health. Some of the key

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