Category Archives: Energy

Beth Ward

After years of work and two weeks of intense negotiations, last week 195 nations agreed to take steps to address climate change. The 21st meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP 21) in Paris was a historic event, and has already resulted in hundreds of published articles, commentaries, and

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Beth Ward

July was the hottest month—ever. The average global temperature was the highest it’s been since recordkeeping started in 1880. And we’re on track for 2015 to be the hottest year ever recorded. Last week, President Barack Obama visited Alaska, the “front lines” of battling climate change, to showcase how residents

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Brooke Ehrenberg
Aruba & Desalination: Tiny Island, Big Innovation
Brooke EhrenbergAugust 26, 2015

This summer marked my fourth trip to the island of Aruba.  It is a small island country, spanning only 69 square miles, yet it is densely populated and comprised of a rich blend of cultures.  During numerous conversations with locals, an interesting fact was presented to me: Aruba is home

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Chris Averill

In April, I blogged about water restriction legislation in California and whether the target reduction of usage was realistic and achievable. The targets focused on reducing residential water consumption by 25 percent, even though agriculture accounts for approximately 80 percent of the water consumption in California. The legislation went into

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Jenn Ganss

Last week, 45,000 residents in California lost power due to equipment damage at PG&E’s El Cerrito Substation. The culprit? A squirrel. The little woodland creature shouldered the blame for a two-hour outage that shut down the Downtown Berkeley BART station and left a graduation ceremony in the dark. Simultaneously, another

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Chris Averill

A few weeks ago, my wife and I traveled to Iceland on vacation where we hiked inside a volcano, soaked in hot springs, climbed behind waterfalls, and walked along a black sand beach. Each of these experiences were unlike anything either of us had experienced before. While on these adventures,

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Shruti Kuppa

Last week, the EPA came out with a draft report stating that there is no evidence that hydraulic fracturing—better known as “fracking”—activities have led to widespread, systematic impacts on drinking water resources in the United States. While this report sparked even more debate over an already contentious issue, the EPA’s

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Chris Averill

Last week, Governor Jerry Brown ordered California’s first-ever statewide mandatory water restrictions in response to the state’s ongoing drought. From September 2014 through February 2015, the average daily per capita water consumption in California was 111 gallons, and varied between 40 and 385 gallons per person per day. An average

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Jared Kosters

In the past decade, researchers have made significant efforts to synthesize and isolate atomic-scale energy materials structures with vastly enhanced performance. Such technological improvements lead to greater energy savings, lower energy costs, and carbon emission reductions. Two materials, in particular, continue to receive a lot of attention in the news:

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Greg Hildeman

In Part II of my “Perspectives on Solar Energy” blog series, I discussed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative’s support for increasing the efficiency of solar energy technology. On February 12, DOE announced that the U.S. solar industry is more than 60 percent of the way toward achieving

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